In honor of Stephen Hawking: The Theory of Everything (2014)- Review

by Nevin Hooper

Unfortunately, on March 14th, the famous theoretical physicist, cosmologist, and author, Stephen Hawking, passed away. I thought in order to remember his accomplishments, and me being a movie buff, I would review the biographical film, The Theory of Everything, starring the excellent Eddie Redmayne as Hawking.

The film follows Stephen (Eddie Redmayne, in a touching performance that earned him a worthy Best Actor Oscar), as he falls in love with a college friend, Jane (Felicity Jones, in a phenomenal performance that got her a nomination for Best Actress). All seems great until he gets diagnosed with his debilitating condition that will haunt him for the rest of his life, though he is still determined to figure out the answer to the universe, and struggles to keep his relationship with Jane.

First, let’s talk about the best part of this movie, Eddie Redmayne. Redmayne totally disappears into this character, and is unbelievably great as Hawking, portraying his physical appearance, and his little moments of intelligence and kindness perfectly. I never saw Redmayne throughout the entire movie, I only saw Stephen Hawking, and his performance must be seen to believe.

Felicity Jones never gets talked about for her performance in this movie. She is so overshadowed by Eddie Redmayne’s exceptional performance that Jones never seems to be mentioned for her equally phenomenal performance. While, yes, she didn’t have to do as much as Eddie Redmayne, her emotional strength is still extremely powerful, showing her emotional imbalance for Stephen perfectly, and very much earned that Best Actress nomination.

The music in this movie was stunning. I loved everything to do with music in this movie; it was quiet, yet at times it was grand and wondrous. It was sad, yet it was mesmerizing, and was just fantastic.

The direction was very calm, yet fast paced, which contributed to the mood of the film, also helped by the excellent.

I love this movie, it was emotional. It was powerful It resonated with me. Enough to give it an 11/10.

Black Panther Movie Review: Always Bet on Black

by Brandon Matzke

Rating: PG-13

Well, I finally saw a new movie in theaters this year! Yay! You see, I avoid the movies during January and February, due to the low-quality material usually put out. But the moment that a great new movie comes out (or at least a pretty good one), my film-going experience kicks off once again. But back on the subject, how was Black Panther? Well… Continue reading →

Double Decker Movie Reviews: Jumanji and The Greatest Showman

By Brandon Matzke and Nevin Hooper

Hello there! It is I, Brandon, here with a new concept for film reviews (at least in this school blog): double decker movie reviews. See, Nevin and I had both seen movies that are currently in theaters: Nevin saw The Greatest Showman and I saw Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle. And to prevent us wasting too much of your time, here’s our thoughts on the films in one article. Ready? Let’s go!

The Greatest Showman

by Nevin Hooper

I saw it. The Greatest Showman. I was Continue reading →

Top 5 Jim Carrey performances

By Brandon Matzke

Well, today is beloved comedian Jim Carrey’s 56th birthday. Despite rarely appearing in major blockbusters anymore, there was a time when this man ruled the world; from his comedy hits like Ace Ventura and Dumb and Dumber, to his more dramatic roles in his later career. And he is one of my favorite comedians ever, so I just had to celebrate his long career with my picks for his best performances. Honorable mention: Lloyd Christmas in Dumb And Dumber; sure, it’s definitely not Oscar-worthy, but for playing a total idiot, he nails the role. Just avoid the sequels and you’ll be fine.

5. The Mask (The Mask)

This must’ve been Carrey’s dream come true: a living cartoon character! Very loosely based on the comics by Dark Horse (which are capable of traumatizing anybody who reads them), this film follows Stanley Ipkuss, a man with a vivid imagination and a dull life until he discovers a mysterious mask, which turns him into the powerful yet zany…. Mask. Clever name, I know, but he nails this role. He’s so much fun to watch as the Mask, from his exaggerated movements to witty remarks, I could tell this was a role he could only dream of. My only problem with Carrey’s performance is the Stanley Ipkuss; compared to the bouncing ball of energy known as the Mask, he’s so… dull. I mean, would you rather watch the banker Stanley Ipkuss, or the walking too-nuts-for-Looney Tunes (yes it is spelled like that) Mask?

4. Ace Ventura (Ave Ventura: Pet Detective)

Ace Ventura is a film that either you love or hate, but I personally believe Carrey gives his best purely comedic performance in it. When the dolphin mascot of the Miami Dolphins is kidnapped, it’s up to the off-the-wall nuts pet detective Ace Ventura to find her. Carrey here is a character who’s both insane and smart; beneath the weirdness is a rather intelligent man who truly cares for his animal clients, and will do anything to protect them. Even if it means playing the role of a crazed former football player, complete with a tutu. The movie absolutely hysterical to watch, and most of which is because of Carrey.

3. Truman Burbank (The Truman Show)

A blend of Carrey’s comedic and dramatic performances, Truman Burbank is an unknowing star of the world-famous Truman Show: which chronicles his life on a day-to-day basis. However, by the time he celebrates his 30th birthday, he notices things aren’t quite as they seem. Carrey was 100% right for being angry at the Oscars for not a single mention: he basically plays two versions of this character; the “Carrey-ism” Truman, the wacky guy he pretends to be in public, and the “human” Truman, a man confused about his place in the world. The rest of the film is great too, from the believable world of the Truman Show to the world around it, it might not be 100% realistic but you can believe it could happen. And Carrey helps this too, with his relatable performance as Truman which made people question if they were secretly on TV for decades. If I haven’t made it clear enough, I recommend this one to anyone interested. Along with the next two…

2. Joel Barish (Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind)

This is my personal favorite film Carrey’s been in, but Carrey isn’t the only reason this gem stands out for me. Eternal Sunshine follows Joel Barish, a man who recently suffered a harsh breakup. Of course, breakups are hard. But this is the not-too-distant future, where you can get memories erased overnight. When Joel decides to use this procedure, things get weird and emotional as he tries to hold on to memories of his former lover. Carrey nails the role of an introverted man, who has no clear idea as to what’s going on. His interactions with Kate Winslet’s Clementine are purely heartfelt, as he tries to hold onto the woman who’s being erased from his entire memory. Carrey isn’t the best part of this movie; he’s merely the icing on a delicious cake, from it’s amazing oscar-winning script, to the breathtakingly bizarre visuals and talented cast. I thought this would be number one, until I discovered the next pick.

1.  Andy Kaufman (Man On The Moon)

What I consider to be one of the most underrated movies ever made, Man On The Moon is based on the life of the famous comedian Andy Kaufman: a comedian now considered ahead of his time, from his strange pranks on his audience, to his tragic death at only 35. About ten minutes into this movie, I completely forgot I was watching Carrey. He completely absorbed himself into this role, mastering all of Kaufman’s mannerisms and humor. I looked up Kaufman’s original skits to see how close Carrey got, and he perfectly nailed them. He also keeps heart into this role, something that could’ve been completely swept under the rug with almost any other actor. My personal favorite scenes of the film are details of Kaufman’s more hidden life, from his romance with his eventual wife to his final goodbye to everyone close to him in a scene which… made me cry….

Top 10 Spielberg movies

By Brandon Matzke and Nevin Hooper

On December 18, the legendary director Steven Spielberg celebrated his 71st birthday. Seeing as he inspired both my and my friend Nevin’s love of movies, I thought it would be fair to cover his best to celebrate a late birthday. So, let’s kick off 2018 with Spielberg’s best! An honorable mention: Hook. I know it’s far from his best, and it does have its flaws, but it still is a good time.

10. Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)

Review by Nevin Hooper and Brandon Matzke

Brandon here, beginning this with a fun tidbit: Continue reading →

Review- The Last Jedi

by Brandon Matzke

Well, Star Wars has been around for a long time. And it definitely doesn’t seem like it’s going to stop soon. This is the eight film in the main Star Wars series (excluding the 999,999+ spin-offs and fan movies) and takes place after the events of The Force Awakens, with Rey finding Luke (only for him to be a man of lost faith) and the rebellion fleeing from the infamous First Order. Sounds familiar? Well, there’s more. Rey and Kylo have a strange link in the force, secrets get revealed, and there’s space horses. Lots of them too.


The characters are still the same we love: despite being the “wise old master,” Luke is still the teenager from Tatooine we all love. He had his humor, but also had a tragic history since Return Of The Jedi that made me still care about him. The newer characters felt expanded too, and the even newer characters felt interesting and fresh (just like how they should’ve been). I found a really interesting aspect of the film to be the relationship between Rey and Kylo Ren; it almost felt like a friendship at times, making some decisions made later in the film feel much more tragic. Rian Johnson’s direction is truly awesome, feeling just like a classic Star Wars film at times, but with a welcome modern touch (I said welcome, unlike the Special Editions). The visuals look great, combining CGI and puppets in the way The Force Awakens had introduced. The music is great, too: the familiar tunes are there, along with newer sounds. And the action is just so well executed, especially the finale. Plus, (no spoilers) a familiar face makes an awesome return.


Some characters felt very underused, like Princess Leia, R2-D2 and C-3PO, and Poe Dameron. I know Carrie Fisher sadly passed during the making of the film, but her character could’ve been used for more than a deus ex-machina moment. Poe just felt one-dimensional: he’s a rebel, so your liking him seems to be the focus with him. And the two most iconic robots in Star Wars barely got to do anything. Some moments in the finale just dragged for me. Some reveals I thought were kinda cool, but disappointed many viewers (and I can see why).


The Last Jedi is proof that Star Wars is very far from ending, thanks to the talents and characters involved in this fantastic world. Is it flawed? Yeah, it has it’s issues. But it does have some heartfelt moments, and appears to be saying that the empire Lucas built is far from collapsing.

Well, you just finished reading my last review for 2017. I had fun this year: met a lot of great people (including really cool fans), saw some great flicks (and some bad, obviously), and got to enjoy my first year writing for this excellent school’s blog. I hope you enjoyed my first year (I promise to return if possible in 2018), and I suggest you follow us at the GHS Voice.